Young Scientists Journal is very happy to announce that its fourth annual conference will take place at Queens’ College, Cambridge on October 12th, and welcome a wealth of inspiring speakers.

In the midst of the city that saw the discovery of the structure of DNA, the publication of Sir Isaac Newton’s “Principia Mathematica” and the first ever splitting of the atom, the Young Scientists Journal Conference 2017 will welcome students from all over the world to a day full of lectures, workshops and activities to inspire them in STEM subjects. Aimed at students aged 14-18, the programme includes a diverse range of disciplines and speakers, and will take place from 9am – 5pm in Queens’ College, Cambridge. Tickets can be booked here.

The line-up of talks includes Dr Michael Sutherland, lecturer at the Cavendish Laboratory at the University of Cambridge, on “What If…Trains Could Fly?”, an investigation into quantum theory and superconductors, Nicole Liew on “What If…Undergraduates could do Real Research?”, an account of her experiences after her undergraduate work proved ground-breaking, and Professor Dame Frances Ashcroft exploring “What If…I follow my passion? A scientist’s life for me – from wild orchids to diabetes”. Having started out at a tiny village school in Dorset, Professor Ashcroft will speak about how she came to be a scientist, her current work on how a rise in blood sugar levels stimulates the release of the hormone insulin, and how it has led to a new therapy for children born with a rare genetic form of diabetes.

The programme also includes a range of workshops for students to take part in. Niek D’Hondt, co-founder of ReaGent, the first DIY biolab in Flanders, Belgium, and a science communication expert, will introduce attendees to the basic elements of story-telling and show how the structure of films can be used to guide presentations and explanations. Professor Becky Parker, Director of the Institute for Research in Schools (IRIS), will introduce opportunities for students to get involved in tackling data from NASA, CERN and genomes, and Neil Trevethan, an Education Projects Manager at the British Science Association, will outline how independent project work can earn a prestigious CREST Award.

In addition to all this, the conference will showcase several STEM exhibitors, including students presenting posters of their own research projects. These presentations will be judged and special prizes awarded to the winners.

Chief Editor Peter He has been with YS Journal for many years, and says “The Young Scientists Journal annual conference has indeed grown from its small King’s School roots – this year Queens’ College Cambridge will be hosting us and will not only be providing a world-famous venue, but also a line-up of world-class speakers. We will be seeing in excess of one hundred delegates, between some of whom, I hope, connections will be made and collaborations founded. Having attended journal events in the past, I am confident that our conference will once again prove to be a great opportunity to be inspired, meet people and have a good time.”

For more information about the workshops, speakers and running of events, visit the Young Scientists Journal events page.

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About Young Scientists Journal
Young Scientists Journal is the world’s peer review science journal, run by young scientists for young scientists. The journal publishes research papers and review articles on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) both online and in print; written, edited and produced exclusively by 12-20 year olds across the globe. 20 issues have been published since it was founded in 2006 at The King’s School Canterbury by Christina Astin and Ghazwan Butrous. Read more at www.ysjournal.com/about-us.

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